An Alternate Method for Determining Functional Gain of Hearing Aids The functional gain of a hearing aid typically is determined by comparing aided and unaided behavioral thresholds. With this method, however, true gain may be underestimated in frequency regions of normal or near-normal hearing sensitivity (i.e., in cases of sloping, rising, or trough-shaped audiograms). Internal hearing-aid noise and/or amplified room ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1984
An Alternate Method for Determining Functional Gain of Hearing Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane Rines
    Boys Town National Institute, Omaha, NE
  • Patricia G. Stelmachowicz
    Boys Town National Institute, Omaha, NE
  • Michael P. Gorga
    Boys Town National Institute, Omaha, NE
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 1984
An Alternate Method for Determining Functional Gain of Hearing Aids
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 627-633. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.627
History: Received December 7, 1983 , Accepted June 6, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 627-633. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.627
History: Received December 7, 1983; Accepted June 6, 1984

The functional gain of a hearing aid typically is determined by comparing aided and unaided behavioral thresholds. With this method, however, true gain may be underestimated in frequency regions of normal or near-normal hearing sensitivity (i.e., in cases of sloping, rising, or trough-shaped audiograms). Internal hearing-aid noise and/or amplified room noise imposes a lower limit on obtainable aided thresholds. In these cases, comparing aided and unaided acoustic-reflex thresholds may be a valuable clinical alternative to traditional means of determining real-ear gain. This study compared sound-field behavioral threshold and acoustic-reflex threshold estimates of functional gain for individuals with a variety of audiometric configurations. The sound-field behavioral threshold measurements were found to underestimate functional gain if unaided thresholds approached the normal hearing range. In regions of greater hearing loss, behavioral and acoustic-reflex estimates of functional gain were in good agreement.

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