Production of Intonation and Contrastive Stress in Electrolaryngeal Speech Acoustical investigations of intonation and contrastive stress patterns in speech produced with electronic artificial larynges were completed. High-quality tape recordings of sentences spoken by 4 normal speakers, 3 users of the Western Electric 5A electrolarynx, and 2 users of the Servox electrolarynx were subjected to acoustic analysis. All electrolarynx users ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1984
Production of Intonation and Contrastive Stress in Electrolaryngeal Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack Gandour
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Bernd Weinberg
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1984
Production of Intonation and Contrastive Stress in Electrolaryngeal Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 605-612. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.605
History: Received February 13, 1984 , Accepted August 29, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 605-612. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.605
History: Received February 13, 1984; Accepted August 29, 1984

Acoustical investigations of intonation and contrastive stress patterns in speech produced with electronic artificial larynges were completed. High-quality tape recordings of sentences spoken by 4 normal speakers, 3 users of the Western Electric 5A electrolarynx, and 2 users of the Servox electrolarynx were subjected to acoustic analysis. All electrolarynx users distinguished stressed from unstressed syllables by varying the duration of syllables and contiguous pauses. One Western Electric 5A speaker also controlled fundamental frequency. This speaker distinguished statements from questions by varying the rate and extent of the initial rising portion of fundamental frequency contours. Findings are interpreted in relation to their implications for clinical intervention and in terms of suggestions for improved design of artificial larynges.

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