Acoustic-Reflex Adaptation Morphology and Half-Life Data for Subjects with Normal Hearing Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1984
Acoustic-Reflex Adaptation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard H. Wilson
    VA Medical Center, Long Beach, CA and University of California, Irvine
  • June K. McCullough
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • David J. Lilly
    Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center, Portland, OR
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1984
Acoustic-Reflex Adaptation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 586-595. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.586
History: Received October 19, 1983 , Accepted August 6, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 586-595. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.586
History: Received October 19, 1983; Accepted August 6, 1984

Acoustic-reflex adaptation was studied in 35 subjects with normal hearing using nine pure-tone activators (250-6000 Hz) and a broadband-noise activator. The individual subject data generated by the 31-s activators presented 10 dB above the reflex threshold were digitized, corrected for baseline drift and ear Canal volume, and analyzed in terms of the acoustic-admittance change in acoustic mmhos and in terms of the percentage of maximum-reflex magnitude. Reflex adaptation increased as a function of frequency. The adaptation functions for the lower frequencies (⩽1500 Hz) were essentially linear over the 31-s activator period, whereas the functions for the higher frequencies (⩾2000 Hz) were curvilinear over the activator period. The experimental half-tile data are compared with a theoretical half-life function that was generated to estimate normal acoustic-reflex adaptation as a function of activator frequency. Finally, the means and standard deviations are reported and discussed for (a) the onset time of adaptation; (b) the half-life time, and (c) the percentage of maximum reflex magnitude at 5-s intervals from 5 to 30 s.

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