Stereotype Formation by Inference A Possible Explanation for the "Stutterer" Stereotype Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1984
Stereotype Formation by Inference
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter A. White
    University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Sara R. C. Collins
    The Apple House, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, England
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1984
Stereotype Formation by Inference
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 567-570. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.567
History: Received September 14, 1983 , Accepted June 25, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 567-570. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.567
History: Received September 14, 1983; Accepted June 25, 1984

The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesis concerning the origin of the stereotype of the stuttering personality. According to this hypothesis the stereotype is formed by inference from beliefs about the internal variables that accompany disfluencies resembling stuttering on occasions when they occur in normally fluent speakers. This hypothesis leads to the prediction that ratings of the personality of the typical adult male stutterer will be similar to ratings of the internal state of a normally fluent speaker during a transitory spell of disfluent speech. This prediction was tested by obtaining.ratings of each of these targets, using the 25 bipolar rating scales employed in previous research on this topic, from two groups each of 40 students. As predicted, the mean ratings of each target were highly correlated across the scales. These results imply that the Stereotype of the stuttering personality, although mainly negative, may be derived not from motivational factors, but from judgments made under uncertainty.

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