Eye Movements of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children during Silent Reading During the silent reading of a 320-word passage, the eye movements of 22 grade school stutterers and 22 nonstutterers were recorded by means of a computer-controlled eye-marker. The recordings were made as a means of determining if the eye movements of the two groups differed and if the differences suggested ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1984
Eye Movements of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children during Silent Reading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • G. J. Brutten
    Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
  • K. Bakker
    University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • P. Janssen
    University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • S. Van Der Meulen
    University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1984
Eye Movements of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children during Silent Reading
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 562-566. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.562
History: Received May 20, 1983 , Accepted June 7, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 562-566. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.562
History: Received May 20, 1983; Accepted June 7, 1984

During the silent reading of a 320-word passage, the eye movements of 22 grade school stutterers and 22 nonstutterers were recorded by means of a computer-controlled eye-marker. The recordings were made as a means of determining if the eye movements of the two groups differed and if the differences suggested that the young stutterers showed evidence of word-specific expectancy. Frame-by-frame analysis of the recordings revealed that the stuttering children displayed significantly more eye fixations and eye regressions than the nonstuttering children. The correlations among the different types of eye measures also varied between the subject groups. The differences observed were present despite the fact that the reading level of the two groups was age appropriate and the subjects sampled did not differ significantly in either reading errors or comprehension. These findings are like those previously found when stuttering and nonstuttering adults were similarly tested. They imply that expectancy is not the response province of older stutterers.

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