Some Environmental Factors and Hypotheses for Stuttering in Families with Several Stutterers Individuals in families with several stutterers (five or more) and individuals in families with no stutterers were the basis of abroad study designed to elucidate both genetic and nongenetic factors relevant to stuttering. In order to examine both nongenetie hypotheses regarding the etiology of stuttering as well as enviromnental factors ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1984
Some Environmental Factors and Hypotheses for Stuttering in Families with Several Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy J. Cox
    Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO
  • Robin A. Seider
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • Kenneth K. Kidd
    Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1984
Some Environmental Factors and Hypotheses for Stuttering in Families with Several Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 543-548. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.543
History: Received March 2, 1983 , Accepted February 6, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 543-548. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.543
History: Received March 2, 1983; Accepted February 6, 1984

Individuals in families with several stutterers (five or more) and individuals in families with no stutterers were the basis of abroad study designed to elucidate both genetic and nongenetic factors relevant to stuttering. In order to examine both nongenetie hypotheses regarding the etiology of stuttering as well as enviromnental factors possibly predisposing to stuttering, data were collected using two structured case-history interviews .and four self-report inventories. We were unable to identify prenatal, developmental, or medical factors that distinguish stutterers from their nonstuttering family members. Further, we found no.evidence of (a) anxiety levels differing among stutterers, their nonstuttering family members, and nonstuttering controls; (b)familial attitudes toward speech differing between nonstuttering family members and those of nonstuttering controls; or (c) ratings of parental behavior or children's traits which distinguished stutterers from nonstuttering family members.

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