Temporal Integration of Tone Glides by Children with Auditory-Memory and Reading Problems Temporal auditory integration for short-duration, frequency-varying signals was examined in children with deficits in auditory memory and reading. Signals were similar to those previously used: a fixed-frequency tone, a tone glide rising in frequency, and a tone glide falling in frequency. No significant differences were found between the Experimental and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1984
Temporal Integration of Tone Glides by Children with Auditory-Memory and Reading Problems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emily A. Tobey
    Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans
  • John K. Cullen, Jr.
    Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1984
Temporal Integration of Tone Glides by Children with Auditory-Memory and Reading Problems
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 527-533. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.527
History: Received July 9, 1982 , Accepted April 2, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 527-533. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.527
History: Received July 9, 1982; Accepted April 2, 1984

Temporal auditory integration for short-duration, frequency-varying signals was examined in children with deficits in auditory memory and reading. Signals were similar to those previously used: a fixed-frequency tone, a tone glide rising in frequency, and a tone glide falling in frequency. No significant differences were found between the Experimental and Control groups' thresholds as a function of signal class (i.e., fixed-frequency or tone glide) or duration. In addition, a significant asymmetry in the thresholds of short-duration rising and falling tone glides was found for both groups. Falling tone glides were detected at higher intensities than were rising tone glides. Data from this study indicated this particular group of children with auditory memory and reading problems was able to detect simple and complex short-duration signals in a manner similar to normal children.

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