Reproducibility and Variability of Speech Muscle Activity in Athetoid Dysarthria of Cerebral Palsy Athetoid dysarthria is thought to result from involuntary movements which are variable and irregular in nature. In this study, electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from six speech muscles was quantified during repetitions of a test sentence by normal and athetoid adult subjects. In the athetoid subjects the articulation of the test ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1984
Reproducibility and Variability of Speech Muscle Activity in Athetoid Dysarthria of Cerebral Palsy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter D. Neilson
    Prince Henry Hospital and School of Medicine University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Nicolas J. O'Dwyer
    Prince Henry Hospital and School of Medicine University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1984
Reproducibility and Variability of Speech Muscle Activity in Athetoid Dysarthria of Cerebral Palsy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 502-517. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.502
History: Received May 11, 1983 , Accepted March 15, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 502-517. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.502
History: Received May 11, 1983; Accepted March 15, 1984

Athetoid dysarthria is thought to result from involuntary movements which are variable and irregular in nature. In this study, electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from six speech muscles was quantified during repetitions of a test sentence by normal and athetoid adult subjects. In the athetoid subjects the articulation of the test sentence was disrupted intermittently by involuntary activity which usually occurred in the time intervals between the syllables in the test sentence, rather than during articulation of the syllables themselves, The EMG activity associated with each syllable in the test sentence was partitioned into reproducible and variable components. The ratio of the reproducible component to the variable component—the signal-to-noise ratio—did not differ Significantly between the two subject groups. In the athetoid subjects, however, the reproducible component of the EMG activity was grossly abnormal. We concluded that this abnormal voluntary activity, rather than variable involuntary activity, was the primary cause of athetoid dysarthria.

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