Effects of Reducing Low-Frequency Amplification on Consonant Perception in Quiet and Noise The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-frequency amplification on speech recognition performance by hearing-impaired listeners. Consonant identification performance by subjects with flat hearing losses and high-frequency hearing losses was assessed in three different hearing aid conditions, in quiet and noise. The experimental hearing aids all ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1984
Effects of Reducing Low-Frequency Amplification on Consonant Perception in Quiet and Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra Gordon-Salant
    University of Maryland, College Park
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1984
Effects of Reducing Low-Frequency Amplification on Consonant Perception in Quiet and Noise
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 483-493. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.483
History: Received June 24, 1983 , Accepted March 7, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1984, Vol. 27, 483-493. doi:10.1044/jshr.2704.483
History: Received June 24, 1983; Accepted March 7, 1984

The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-frequency amplification on speech recognition performance by hearing-impaired listeners. Consonant identification performance by subjects with flat hearing losses and high-frequency hearing losses was assessed in three different hearing aid conditions, in quiet and noise. The experimental hearing aids all provided extra high-frequency amplification but differed in the amount of low-frequency amplification. The results showed that listeners with flat hearing losses benefited by low-frequency amplification, whereas subjects with high-frequency hearing losses exhibited deteriorating scores in conditions with greatest low-frequency amplification. Analyses of phonetic feature perception and individual consonant recognition scores revealed subtle interactions between hearing loss configuration and amplification contour.

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