Stimulus Duration and Frequency Discrimination for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects Frequency discrimination for 500- and 2000-Hz pure tones at durations of 5, 10, 20, 50, and 200 ms was determined for 10 normal-hearing and 10 cochlear-impaired listeners. Listeners from both groups demonstrated monotonic increases in frequency difference limens as stimulus duration decreased. The functions of the hearing-impaired listeners were parallel ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1984
Stimulus Duration and Frequency Discrimination for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph W. Hall
    MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University of Nottingham, U,K.
  • Elizabeth J. Wood
    MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University of Nottingham, U,K.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1984
Stimulus Duration and Frequency Discrimination for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1984, Vol. 27, 252-256. doi:10.1044/jshr.2702.256
History: Received June 13, 1983 , Accepted January 11, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1984, Vol. 27, 252-256. doi:10.1044/jshr.2702.256
History: Received June 13, 1983; Accepted January 11, 1984

Frequency discrimination for 500- and 2000-Hz pure tones at durations of 5, 10, 20, 50, and 200 ms was determined for 10 normal-hearing and 10 cochlear-impaired listeners. Listeners from both groups demonstrated monotonic increases in frequency difference limens as stimulus duration decreased. The functions of the hearing-impaired listeners were parallel to those of the normal-hearing listeners for stimulus durations between 10 and 200 ms, but the overall performance of the hearing-impaired group was poorer than that of the normal-hearing group. The functions of many of the cochlear-impaired subjects were less steep than normal for the shortest durations tested (between 5 and l0 ms). There appeared to be no relation between temporal integration for frequency discrimination and temporal integration for detection threshold. The results are discussed in terms of processes of temporal integration and frequency selectivity.

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