Analysis ofStutterers' Voice Onset Times and Fundamental Frequency Contours during Fluency The purpose of this study was to examine stutterers' and nonstutterers' fluent voice onset time (VOT) and fundamental frequency (F0) contour measures from target syllables located at the beginning of a carrier phrase. Ten adult male stutterers were matched within one year of age with 10 adult male nonstutterers. Oscillographic ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1984
Analysis ofStutterers' Voice Onset Times and Fundamental Frequency Contours during Fluency
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. Charles Healey
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Barbara Gutkin
    Lincoln Public School System, Lincoln, NE
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1984
Analysis ofStutterers' Voice Onset Times and Fundamental Frequency Contours during Fluency
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1984, Vol. 27, 219-225. doi:10.1044/jshr.2702.219
History: Received February 22, 1983 , Accepted October 13, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1984, Vol. 27, 219-225. doi:10.1044/jshr.2702.219
History: Received February 22, 1983; Accepted October 13, 1983

The purpose of this study was to examine stutterers' and nonstutterers' fluent voice onset time (VOT) and fundamental frequency (F0) contour measures from target syllables located at the beginning of a carrier phrase. Ten adult male stutterers were matched within one year of age with 10 adult male nonstutterers. Oscillographic and spectrographic analyses of subjects' VOT and F0 at vowel onset, average vowel F0, and speed and range of Fo change were obtained from fluent productions of 18 stop consonant-vowel syllables. Results showed that VOTs for voiced stops and the range of F0 change for voiceless stops were associated with significant between-group differences. All other dependent measures were not significantly different between the two groups. When eompared with past research, these findings indicate that greater differences emerge between stutterers and nonstutterers when measures of fluency are taken at the beginning than in the middle of a carrier phrase. Implications for future research are discussed.

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