Laryngograph as a Measure of Vocal Fold Contact Area The present investigation sought to provide additional information concerning the laryngograph as a means to study vocal fold contact area. Subglottal pressures were sensed simultaneously with the laryngographic signal while the speaker produced a variety of speech tasks. The onset and cessation of the subglottal pressure waveform was studied relative ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1984
Laryngograph as a Measure of Vocal Fold Contact Area
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H. R. Gilbert
    Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Charles R. Potter
    Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey
  • Ronald Hoodin
    Pennsylvania State University, University Park
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1984
Laryngograph as a Measure of Vocal Fold Contact Area
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1984, Vol. 27, 178-182. doi:10.1044/jshr.2702.178
History: Received July 21, 1982 , Accepted August 12, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1984, Vol. 27, 178-182. doi:10.1044/jshr.2702.178
History: Received July 21, 1982; Accepted August 12, 1983

The present investigation sought to provide additional information concerning the laryngograph as a means to study vocal fold contact area. Subglottal pressures were sensed simultaneously with the laryngographic signal while the speaker produced a variety of speech tasks. The onset and cessation of the subglottal pressure waveform was studied relative to the laryngographic and speech waveforms. Differences were noted for voiced-voiceless contrasts for bilabial stop consonant production and vocal effort changes during the three vowels studied. Also a high-resistance polymer strip was placed between the vocal folds and gradually removed while simultaneous laryngographic recordings were obtained during sustained productions of the vowel/Δ/. An increase in the amplitude of the laryngographie waveform upon withdrawal of the polymer strip strongly supported the concept that the laryngographic signal is generated directly by the change in conductance due to alterations in the area of vocal fold contact.

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