Tonal Confusions in Thai Patients with Sensorineural Hearing Loss In a tone language, every syllable or word may have a distinctive pitch pattern as part of its phonemic composition. This Study examined the extent and nature of impairment in the perception of phonemic tones by hearing-impaired listeners in Thai, a tone language that has five phonemic tones. Seventy-six subjects ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1984
Tonal Confusions in Thai Patients with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack Gandour
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Arlene Carney
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Chuleeporn Nimitbunnasarn
    Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Poonpit Amatyakul
    Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1984
Tonal Confusions in Thai Patients with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 89-97. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.89
History: Received February 16, 1983 , Accepted July 8, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 89-97. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.89
History: Received February 16, 1983; Accepted July 8, 1983

In a tone language, every syllable or word may have a distinctive pitch pattern as part of its phonemic composition. This Study examined the extent and nature of impairment in the perception of phonemic tones by hearing-impaired listeners in Thai, a tone language that has five phonemic tones. Seventy-six subjects were assigned to four listener groups: normal-hearing (n = 21), mild-hearing-loss (n = 21), moderate-hearing-loss (n = 26), and severe-hearing-loss (n = 8). Five Thai words differing only in tone were presented for identification in both natural speech and synthetic speech versions. Results from the phonemic identification tests indicated that tonal identification is affected by the presence of sensorineural hearing loss. In particular, the number and often the type of tonal confusions made by Thai hearing-impaired listeners varied with the extent of hearing loss for both natural and synthetic speech versions. In contrast to previous findings on the patterns of consonant and vowel confusions in hearing-impairedlisteners, the patterns of tonal confusions in hearing-impaired listeners can be related to the degree of hearing loss.

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