Mechanics of Vocal Fold Vibration and Laryngeal Articulatory Gestures Produced by Hearing-Impaired Speakers The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how abnormal laryngeal mechanical valving actions might contribute to excessive air volume expenditures during the speech of the deaf. High-speed laryngeal film and high-quality acoustic data were collected simultaneously from two normally hearing and four hearing-impaired adults. Results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1984
Mechanics of Vocal Fold Vibration and Laryngeal Articulatory Gestures Produced by Hearing-Impaired Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dale Evan Metz
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York
  • Robert L. Whitehead
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York
  • Brenda H. Whitehead
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1984
Mechanics of Vocal Fold Vibration and Laryngeal Articulatory Gestures Produced by Hearing-Impaired Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 62-69. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.62
History: Received August 23, 1982 , Accepted June 2, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 62-69. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.62
History: Received August 23, 1982; Accepted June 2, 1983

The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how abnormal laryngeal mechanical valving actions might contribute to excessive air volume expenditures during the speech of the deaf. High-speed laryngeal film and high-quality acoustic data were collected simultaneously from two normally hearing and four hearing-impaired adults. Results indicate that hearing-impaired speakers (a) may be unable to control the intrinsic laryngeal musculature which maintains periodic vocal fold oscillation, and (b) may exhibit inappropriate positioning of laryngeal structures during speech production.

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