Self-Report Approach to Assessing Benefit Derived from Amplification The ultimate goal of hearing aid selection procedures is successful use of amplification in everyday communication. The need to validate selection procedures is widely recognized, but the development of relevant criterion measures is a prerequisite to evaluation of predictive validity. This study explored the feasibility of using a self-report method ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1984
Self-Report Approach to Assessing Benefit Derived from Amplification
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Marilyn E. Demorest
    University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville
  • Ernest L. Hepler
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1984
Self-Report Approach to Assessing Benefit Derived from Amplification
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 49-56. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.49
History: Received January 28, 1983 , Accepted July 7, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 49-56. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.49
History: Received January 28, 1983; Accepted July 7, 1983

The ultimate goal of hearing aid selection procedures is successful use of amplification in everyday communication. The need to validate selection procedures is widely recognized, but the development of relevant criterion measures is a prerequisite to evaluation of predictive validity. This study explored the feasibility of using a self-report method of measuring success with amplification. A 64-item questionnaire was administered to 128 experienced hearing aid users who rated the benefit received from amplification in a variety of situations. Internal consistency reliability was excellent (α = .96), indicating that the perceived benefit is sufficiently consistent across situations to yield reliable measures of individual differences among patients. Factor analysis of the interitem correlation matrix, however, led to the identification of four types of situations that might be assessed separately: (a) noisy situations; (b) quiet situations with the speaker in proximity; (c) situations with reduced signal information; and (d) situations with nonspeeeh stimuli. In general, patients reported significantly more benefit from their aids in quiet situations than in noise. A self-report methodology for measuring successful use of amplification in daily life appears promising as a criterion measure in predictive validation studies of hearing aid selection procedures.

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