Magnitude Estimation of Loudness II Loudness Perception in Presbycusic Listeners Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1984
Magnitude Estimation of Loudness II
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kimberly Keller Knight
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
  • Robert H. Margolis
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1984
Magnitude Estimation of Loudness II
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 28-32. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.28
History: Received January 3, 1983 , Accepted July 5, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 28-32. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.28
History: Received January 3, 1983; Accepted July 5, 1983

Because clinical methods most commonly used for assessing loudness are indirect measures that require one normal or near normal ear, loudness perception has not been studied thoroughly in listeners with symmetrical hearing loss. In this investigation, loudness perception was studied in three groups of listeners: normal listeners, listeners with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss, and individuals with bilaterally symmetrical hearing impairment due to presbycusis. In Experiment 1, a Magnitude Estimation of Loudness (ME) technique was compared to Alternate Binaural Loudness Balance (ABLB) results for subjects with asymmetrical hearing impairment. Results indicate that ME and ABLB measurements produce similar evidence of abnormally rapid growth of loudness in asymmetrically impaired listeners. In Experiment 2, loudness growth in individuals with normal hearing or with presbycusic hearing impairment was determined from ME measurements. Although presbycusic subjects tended to have steeper loudness functions than normal subjects, the differences did not reach statistical significance except at 6000 Hz, suggesting that, as a group, presbycusic listeners display little, if any, recruitment of loudness.

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