Magnitude Estimation of Loudness I Application to Hearing Aid Selection Three experiments were conducted to explore the utility of magnitude estimation of loudness for hearing aid selection. In Experiment 1 the loudness discomfort level (LDL), most comfortable loudness (MCL), and magnitude estimations (MEs) of loudness were obtained from normal-hearing subjects. MCLs fell within a range of loudnesses that was relatively ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1984
Magnitude Estimation of Loudness I Application to Hearing Aid Selection
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Geller
    Syracuse Developmental Center, Syracuse, New York
  • Robert H. Margolis
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1984
Magnitude Estimation of Loudness I Application to Hearing Aid Selection
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 20-27. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.20
History: Received May 26, 1982 , Accepted May 12, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 20-27. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.20
History: Received May 26, 1982; Accepted May 12, 1983

Three experiments were conducted to explore the utility of magnitude estimation of loudness for hearing aid selection. In Experiment 1 the loudness discomfort level (LDL), most comfortable loudness (MCL), and magnitude estimations (MEs) of loudness were obtained from normal-hearing subjects. MCLs fell within a range of loudnesses that was relatively low on the loudness function. The LDLs were lower than previously published values. Experiment 2 was performed to identify the source of disparity between our LDL data and previously reported results. The effects of instructions are demonstrated and discussed. In Experiment 3 magnitude estimations of loudness were used to determine the loudness of tonal stimuli selected to represent ⅓ octave band levels of speech. Over the 500–4000 Hz range, the contributions of the various frequency regions to the loudness of speech appears to be nearly constant. Methods are proposed for (a) predicting the frequency-gain response of a hearing aid that restores normal loudness for speech for the hearing-impaired listener and (b) psychophysically evaluating the compression characteristic of a hearing aid.

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