Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio and Psychophysical Measurement of the Degree of Hoarseness The degree of hoarseness can be evaluated by judging the extent to which noise replaces the harmonic structure in the Spectrogram. The relationship between these two components was quantified as the harmonics-to-noise (H/N) ratio. Eighty-seven phonatory samples (sustained vowel /a/), ranging from nearly normal to severely hoarse, were analyzed. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1984
Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio and Psychophysical Measurement of the Degree of Hoarseness
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eiji Yumoto
    Ehime University, Ehime, Japan
  • Yumi Sasaki
    Ehime University, Ehime, Japan
  • Hiroshi Okamura
    Ehime University, Ehime, Japan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1984
Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio and Psychophysical Measurement of the Degree of Hoarseness
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 2-6. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.02
History: Received February 16, 1983 , Accepted August 31, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1984, Vol. 27, 2-6. doi:10.1044/jshr.2701.02
History: Received February 16, 1983; Accepted August 31, 1983

The degree of hoarseness can be evaluated by judging the extent to which noise replaces the harmonic structure in the Spectrogram. The relationship between these two components was quantified as the harmonics-to-noise (H/N) ratio. Eighty-seven phonatory samples (sustained vowel /a/), ranging from nearly normal to severely hoarse, were analyzed. The H/N ratio, the spectrographic classification, and cycle-to-cycle pitch perturbations (jitter) each showed a significant correlation with the psychophysical measurement of the degree of hoarseness (r = .809, .805, and .712, respectively; p < .001). The analysis also revealed that the correlations of the psychophysical measurement of the degree of hoarseness with the first two parameters were significantly higher than that with jitter (p < .05). Moreover, the spectrographic classification is subjective, and its scale is discrete and coarse. Therefore, the H/N ratio seems to be the most applicable in the clinic as a quantitative index of the degree of hoarseness.

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