Tinnitus and Neural Activity The spontaneous discharge rates of auditory nerve fibers were measured in a group of normal chinchillas and in a group of chinchillas with high-frequency, noise-induced hearing loss. In contrast to normal units, the high-frequency units in the noise-exposed animals tended to have elevated spontaneous discharge rates, high thresholds, and a ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1983
Tinnitus and Neural Activity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard J. Salvi
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
  • William A. Ahroon
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
Article Information
Research Note
Research Note   |   December 01, 1983
Tinnitus and Neural Activity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 629-632. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.629
History: Received July 15, 1982 , Accepted February 4, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 629-632. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.629
History: Received July 15, 1982; Accepted February 4, 1983

The spontaneous discharge rates of auditory nerve fibers were measured in a group of normal chinchillas and in a group of chinchillas with high-frequency, noise-induced hearing loss. In contrast to normal units, the high-frequency units in the noise-exposed animals tended to have elevated spontaneous discharge rates, high thresholds, and a lack of two-tone inhibition. The change in spontaneous discharge rate across the distribution of nerve fibers is related to models of tinnitus and to human psychophysical data.

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