Force Transducers for the Evaluation of Labial, Lingual, and Mandibular Motor Impairments Three transducers were developed for evaluating lip, tongue, and jaw muscle force control in individuals with motor speech disorders. The rationale for the development of these transducers was based upon the hypothesized need for clinical assessment of the individual motor subsystems of the speech production mechanism. To provide an indication ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1983
Force Transducers for the Evaluation of Labial, Lingual, and Mandibular Motor Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven M. Barlow
    Speech Motor Control Laboratories, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • James H. Abbs
    Speech Motor Control Laboratories, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • * Steven Barlow is currently affiliated with Boys' Town National Institute, Omaha, NE.
    Steven Barlow is currently affiliated with Boys' Town National Institute, Omaha, NE.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1983
Force Transducers for the Evaluation of Labial, Lingual, and Mandibular Motor Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 616-621. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.616
History: Received June 21, 1982 , Accepted June 2, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 616-621. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.616
History: Received June 21, 1982; Accepted June 2, 1983

Three transducers were developed for evaluating lip, tongue, and jaw muscle force control in individuals with motor speech disorders. The rationale for the development of these transducers was based upon the hypothesized need for clinical assessment of the individual motor subsystems of the speech production mechanism. To provide an indication of the utility of these devices, exemplary force control data from adults with Parkinson's disease and spastic cerebral palsy are provided. Observations of differential force control impairment in the labial, lingual, and mandibular subsystems of these dysarthric individuals supported the rationale for this development. Observations were made also concerning the utility of these nonspeech measures for predicting speech motor dysfunction.

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