Picture Naming in Language-Impaired Children A picture-naming task was used to examine word-finding problems in language-impaired children. The subjects included 20 language-impaired children, 20 normal children matched to the language-impaired children for chronological age, and 20 normal children matched to the language-impaired children on a composite index of language age. Children were shown 64 pictures ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1983
Picture Naming in Language-Impaired Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Marilyn A. Nippold
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Robert Kail
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Catherine A. Hale
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1983
Picture Naming in Language-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 609-615. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.609
History: Received November 5, 1982 , Accepted June 1, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 609-615. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.609
History: Received November 5, 1982; Accepted June 1, 1983

A picture-naming task was used to examine word-finding problems in language-impaired children. The subjects included 20 language-impaired children, 20 normal children matched to the language-impaired children for chronological age, and 20 normal children matched to the language-impaired children on a composite index of language age. Children were shown 64 pictures of objects and asked to name each as rapidly as possible. The principal findings were that (a) pictures of objects with more frequently occurring names were named more rapidly than pictures of objects with less frequently occurring names; (b) language-impaired children named pictures less rapidly than their chronological-age peers but more rapidly than their language-age peers; and (c) the effects of frequency of occurrence on naming time were comparable for all three groups of children. Factors that may have accounted for the findings are discussed.

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