The Influence of Production Mode on the Recall of Signs in Normal Adult Subjects Preliminary evidence has suggested that signs produced with contact between the two hands or between the hand and body are learned more readily than signs produced without such contact. Using a paradigm that eliminated the possibly confounding variables of previous studies, the effect of production mode on sign acquisition and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1983
The Influence of Production Mode on the Recall of Signs in Normal Adult Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lyle L. Lloyd
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Jane E. Doherty
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1983
The Influence of Production Mode on the Recall of Signs in Normal Adult Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 595-600. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.595
History: Received June 4, 1982 , Accepted November 23, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 595-600. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.595
History: Received June 4, 1982; Accepted November 23, 1982

Preliminary evidence has suggested that signs produced with contact between the two hands or between the hand and body are learned more readily than signs produced without such contact. Using a paradigm that eliminated the possibly confounding variables of previous studies, the effect of production mode on sign acquisition and recall was investigated with normal young adults. Results indicated that contact signs were acquired more readily than noncontact signs by one of two subject groups. More contact than noncontact signs were produced correctly during recall. Recall at 1 week was equivalent to that at same day for contact signs, but same-day recall was greater than 1-week recall for noncontact signs. Examination of responses that were correct except for a contact/noncontact discrepancy suggested that contact was added more often than it was deleted from signs during recall. These findings are discussed in terms of the role of tactile feedback in learning and memory and their potential application to teaching signs to nonverbal children.

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