Effects of Parental Deafness and Early Exposure to Manual Communication on the Cognitive Skills, English Language Skill, and Field Independence of Young Deaf Adults Congenitally deaf college students with deaf parents who were native ASL signers (the ASL group) were compared to congenitally deaf college students who learned to sign between the ages of 6 and 12 years and who had hearing parents (the Delayed sign language group) on tests of cognitive skills, the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1983
Effects of Parental Deafness and Early Exposure to Manual Communication on the Cognitive Skills, English Language Skill, and Field Independence of Young Deaf Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ila Parasnis
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1983
Effects of Parental Deafness and Early Exposure to Manual Communication on the Cognitive Skills, English Language Skill, and Field Independence of Young Deaf Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 588-594. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.588
History: Received September 29, 1982 , Accepted March 17, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 588-594. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.588
History: Received September 29, 1982; Accepted March 17, 1983

Congenitally deaf college students with deaf parents who were native ASL signers (the ASL group) were compared to congenitally deaf college students who learned to sign between the ages of 6 and 12 years and who had hearing parents (the Delayed sign language group) on tests of cognitive skills, the cognitive style of field independence/dependence, and English language presented and produced through spoken, written, and sign modes. A control group of hearing college students was also included in the study. Differential effects of parental deafness and early exposure to manual communication, generally reported for deaf children, were not observed in the cognitive and communication performance of the experimental subjects. Furthermore, the Delayed sign language group performed significantly better than the ASL group on tests of speech perception and speech intelligibility. No differences on tests on cognitive skills were observed between the deaf and hearing subjects or between males and females. However, deaf females in both groups were more field dependent than deaf males and hearing females, while deaf males did not differ from hearing males. A test of speech reception skill was the only predictor of field independence for the ASL group while a test of cognitive skills was the only predictor of field independence for the other two groups.

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