Deaf Speakers' Laryngeal Behavior The purpose of this study was to compare deaf speakers' (n = 4) laryngeal behavior during voiced and voiceless consonant productions to that of normal hearing subjects (n = 4). Laryngeal behavior during these two speaker groups' productions of six word-initial stop plosives (/b d g p t k/) and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1983
Deaf Speakers' Laryngeal Behavior
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James J. Mahshie
    Gallaudet College, Washington, DC
  • Edward G. Conture
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1983
Deaf Speakers' Laryngeal Behavior
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 550-559. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.550
History: Received March 22, 1982 , Accepted March 16, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 550-559. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.550
History: Received March 22, 1982; Accepted March 16, 1983

The purpose of this study was to compare deaf speakers' (n = 4) laryngeal behavior during voiced and voiceless consonant productions to that of normal hearing subjects (n = 4). Laryngeal behavior during these two speaker groups' productions of six word-initial stop plosives (/b d g p t k/) and fricatives (/v z ð f s θ/) was visually observed by means of a flexible fiberoptic nasolaryngoscope (fiberscope). The visualizations and their acoustic correlates were audiovisually recorded. The audiovisual recordings were analyzed by means of both frame-by-frame categorical judgments of laryngeal behavior and broad phonetic transcriptions of the accuracv/inaccuracv of consonantal voicing. Results indicated that deaf speakers' laryngeal behavior during production of those consonants perceived accurately voiced was comparable to that of normal speakers, whereas deaf speakers' laryngeal behavior during production of consonants perceived as inaccurately voiced generally differed in various ways from normal. Findings seem to suggest that some aspects of deaf speakers' atypical laryngeal behavior associated with inaccurately voiced consonants may be due to an aberrant linguistic system while other aspects may be due to inadequate laryngeal motor control.

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