An Attributional Model of Supervisors' Decision-Making Behavior in Speech-Language Pathology An attributional model of speech-language pathology supervisors' decision-making behavior based on Weiner's achievement motivation attributional model was applied. Forty-six supervisors were asked to imagine hypothetical good or poor therapy sessions and to cite causes for the session's outcome, request information to understand the outcome better, and suggest actions they would ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1983
An Attributional Model of Supervisors' Decision-Making Behavior in Speech-Language Pathology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Erwick Roberts
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Rita C. Naremore
    Indiana University, Bloomington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1983
An Attributional Model of Supervisors' Decision-Making Behavior in Speech-Language Pathology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 537-549. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.537
History: Received May 14, 1982 , Accepted February 10, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 537-549. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.537
History: Received May 14, 1982; Accepted February 10, 1983

An attributional model of speech-language pathology supervisors' decision-making behavior based on Weiner's achievement motivation attributional model was applied. Forty-six supervisors were asked to imagine hypothetical good or poor therapy sessions and to cite causes for the session's outcome, request information to understand the outcome better, and suggest actions they would take in response to the particular outcome. Results indicated that clinician attributions were cited most frequently and few client, supervisor, or other attributions were made. Clinician factors were generally described in terms of planning behaviors, instructional behaviors, and strategies. Session outcomes were attributed primarily to factors controllable by the participants and were expected to vary over time. Supervisors most frequently requested information about the clinician, client, and structure of therapy. They suggested actions that focused primarily on the clinician, occurred after the session, and were directed by the supervisor. Supervisors' causal attributions, information requests, and action responses differed for good and poor sessions. Implications for supervisory practice are discussed.

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