Acoustic Analysis of Stutterers' Fluent Speech before and after Therapy The speech of 14 stutterers was analyzed prior to and at the termination of a 5-week stuttering therapy program to examine the relationship between nine selected acoustic variables and stuttering frequency. Group analyses indicated that pre- to post- therapy changes in stuttering frequency were accompanied by mean changes in five ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1983
Acoustic Analysis of Stutterers' Fluent Speech before and after Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dale Evan Metz
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York
  • Vincent J. Samar
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York
  • Pat Richard Sacco
    State University College of Arts and Sciences, Geneseo, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1983
Acoustic Analysis of Stutterers' Fluent Speech before and after Therapy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 531-536. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.531
History: Received February 17, 1982 , Accepted March 23, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1983, Vol. 26, 531-536. doi:10.1044/jshr.2604.531
History: Received February 17, 1982; Accepted March 23, 1983

The speech of 14 stutterers was analyzed prior to and at the termination of a 5-week stuttering therapy program to examine the relationship between nine selected acoustic variables and stuttering frequency. Group analyses indicated that pre- to post- therapy changes in stuttering frequency were accompanied by mean changes in five of the nine acoustic variables, a finding which is consistent with previous literature. Correlational analyses indicated that only silence in the voiced stop consonant intervocalic interval (IVI) was significantly correlated with stuttering frequency prior to therapy (i.e., lower stuttering frequency values were associated with shorter durations of silence during the IVI). Furthermore, the degree of reduction in silence was positively correlated with the magnitude of reduction in stuttering frequency due to therapy. These findings suggest that silence in the IVI may reflect the operational status of some mechanism which may underlie disfluent speech.

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