Midfrequency Dysfunction in Listeners Having High-Frequency Sensorineural Hearing Loss Two-tone unmasking, psychophysical tuning curves and pure-tone masking patterns were measured at 500 and 1000 Hz in 17 listeners having high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss due to noise exposure. Results were compared to similar data obtained from 20 normal-hearing young adults. In addition, measures of word-recognition ability were obtained in quiet ... Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   September 01, 1983
Midfrequency Dysfunction in Listeners Having High-Frequency Sensorineural Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larry E. Humes
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Bill Wilkerson Hearing and Speech Center, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1983
Midfrequency Dysfunction in Listeners Having High-Frequency Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1983, Vol. 26, 425-435. doi:10.1044/jshr.2603.425
History: Received June 16, 1982 , Accepted December 15, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1983, Vol. 26, 425-435. doi:10.1044/jshr.2603.425
History: Received June 16, 1982; Accepted December 15, 1982

Two-tone unmasking, psychophysical tuning curves and pure-tone masking patterns were measured at 500 and 1000 Hz in 17 listeners having high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss due to noise exposure. Results were compared to similar data obtained from 20 normal-hearing young adults. In addition, measures of word-recognition ability were obtained in quiet and in noise for both groups. The primary findings were as follows: (a) 29% (n = 5) of the hearing-impaired subjects exhibited abnormal results on at least one of the psychoacoustic tasks investigated; (b) the observed abnormalities were reliable; and (c) there appeared to be a relation between the presence of midfrequency dysfunction and degree of difficulty on word-recognition tasks. These results and their implications are discussed.

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