The Perception of Nonverbal Vocal Cues of Emotional Meaning by Language-Disordered and Normal Children The purpose of this study was to compare language-disordered and normal children in terms of their ability to interpret emotional meaning from the vocal cues of an adult speaker. The findings indicated that language-disordered children were less accurate in identifying vocal cues of emotion than were normal children, although their ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1983
The Perception of Nonverbal Vocal Cues of Emotional Meaning by Language-Disordered and Normal Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John A. Courtright
    Cleveland State University, Ohio
  • Illene C. Courtright
    Private Practice, Cleveland, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1983
The Perception of Nonverbal Vocal Cues of Emotional Meaning by Language-Disordered and Normal Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1983, Vol. 26, 412-417. doi:10.1044/jshr.2603.412
History: Received February 8, 1982 , Accepted October 21, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1983, Vol. 26, 412-417. doi:10.1044/jshr.2603.412
History: Received February 8, 1982; Accepted October 21, 1982

The purpose of this study was to compare language-disordered and normal children in terms of their ability to interpret emotional meaning from the vocal cues of an adult speaker. The findings indicated that language-disordered children were less accurate in identifying vocal cues of emotion than were normal children, although their pattern of errors was not significantly different. These findings are discussed in terms of Lubert's (1981) "acoustic feature theory" of language impairment, and suggestions for future research are advanced.

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