Mental Rotation Abilities in Language-Disordered Children This study investigated the possibility that language-disordered children suffer a pervasive representational deficit. A mental rotation task was used to measure proficiency in visual imagery, one of the major nonlinguistic symbolic modes. Normal and language-disordered first and third graders (matched for sex and cognitive level) were asked to decide whether ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1983
Mental Rotation Abilities in Language-Disordered Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith R. Johnston
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Susan Ellis Weismer
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1983
Mental Rotation Abilities in Language-Disordered Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1983, Vol. 26, 397-403. doi:10.1044/jshr.2603.397
History: Received May 27, 1982 , Accepted April 14, 1983
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1983, Vol. 26, 397-403. doi:10.1044/jshr.2603.397
History: Received May 27, 1982; Accepted April 14, 1983

This study investigated the possibility that language-disordered children suffer a pervasive representational deficit. A mental rotation task was used to measure proficiency in visual imagery, one of the major nonlinguistic symbolic modes. Normal and language-disordered first and third graders (matched for sex and cognitive level) were asked to decide whether two geometric arrays were similarly ordered. Arrays were presented parallel or with the right hand array rotated about its center either 45°, 90°, or 135° in the picture plane. A significant (p < .001) linear relationship between degree of rotation and reaction time indicated that children in all groups were using imagistic processes. Language-disordered children did not differ from normal children in accuracy of judgement or require more training trials, but they did respond more slowly (p < .02). These findings suggest an impairment of visual imagery and hence representational deficits which extend beyond language. Current evidence does not, however, indicate whether difficulties with nonverbal and verbal symbolic modes stem from a single source.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access