Performative and Presuppositional Skills in Language-Disordered and Normal Children The presuppositional and performative abilities of language-disordered and normal children were compared, controlling for the children's ability to use the lexical items required in the experimental task. Subjects were 36 children, 18 normal and 18 language-disordered, functioning at a single-word level of linguistics development. Results revealed that both the language-disordered ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1983
Performative and Presuppositional Skills in Language-Disordered and Normal Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynne E. Rowan
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Kathy Chapman
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Amy L. Weiss
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1983
Performative and Presuppositional Skills in Language-Disordered and Normal Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 97-106. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.97
History: Received August 10, 1981 , Accepted March 22, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 97-106. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.97
History: Received August 10, 1981; Accepted March 22, 1982

The presuppositional and performative abilities of language-disordered and normal children were compared, controlling for the children's ability to use the lexical items required in the experimental task. Subjects were 36 children, 18 normal and 18 language-disordered, functioning at a single-word level of linguistics development. Results revealed that both the language-disordered and the normal children showed a tendency to encode changing rather than unchanging situational elements. The two groups of children also demonstrated similar levels of imperative and declarative performative intent. For both groups, performative and presuppositional behaviors were usually in the form of word productions. Discrepancies between the findings of this and other investigations are discussed with respect to the size of the children's lexicons, their expressive command of the lexicon, chronological age, and representational skills.

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