Contextual Effects in the Measurement of Hearing-Impaired Speakers' Intelligibility Previous research has indicated that hearing-impaired speakers' intelligibility scores are better when sentences are used than when word lists are used as speech material in word identification tests. The speech intelligibility of 20 hearing-impaired speakers was measured with word identification tests using isolated words (W-22 monosyllables) and words in sentences ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1983
Contextual Effects in the Measurement of Hearing-Impaired Speakers' Intelligibility
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronald W. Sitler
    State University of New York, Genesco
  • Nicholas Schiavetti
    State University of New York, Genesco
  • Dale Evans Metz
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1983
Contextual Effects in the Measurement of Hearing-Impaired Speakers' Intelligibility
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 30-35. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.30
History: Received July 10, 1981 , Accepted February 12, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 30-35. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.30
History: Received July 10, 1981; Accepted February 12, 1982

Previous research has indicated that hearing-impaired speakers' intelligibility scores are better when sentences are used than when word lists are used as speech material in word identification tests. The speech intelligibility of 20 hearing-impaired speakers was measured with word identification tests using isolated words (W-22 monosyllables) and words in sentences context (CID sentences). Analysis of individual speaker' intelligibility data revealed that sentence intelligibility scores were higher than word intelligibility scores only for the better speakers and that no differences were apparent between sentence and single-word intelligibility for the poorer speakers. These findings agree with the results of research with normal speeds degraged in intelligibility by noise or filtering and indicate that an interaction may exist between context and overall intelligibility in which only speech that has a certain degree of overall intelligibility may show further intelligibility improvement with increased contextual clues.

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