Perception of Intonational Contrasts in Alaryngeal Speech The achievement of intonational contrasts by 4 normal and 16 laryngectomized speakers was assessed in this project. The laryngectomized subjects represented four clinical subgroups of alaryngeal speech: esophageal, tracheoesophageal, Western Electric #5 electrolarynx, and Servox electrolarynx. High-quality tape recordings of each subject's productions of two pairs of sentences (Bev loves ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1983
Perception of Intonational Contrasts in Alaryngeal Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack Gandour
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Bernd Weinberg
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1983
Perception of Intonational Contrasts in Alaryngeal Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 142-148. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.142
History: Received November 25, 1981 , Accepted April 8, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 142-148. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.142
History: Received November 25, 1981; Accepted April 8, 1982

The achievement of intonational contrasts by 4 normal and 16 laryngectomized speakers was assessed in this project. The laryngectomized subjects represented four clinical subgroups of alaryngeal speech: esophageal, tracheoesophageal, Western Electric #5 electrolarynx, and Servox electrolarynx. High-quality tape recordings of each subject's productions of two pairs of sentences (Bev loves Bob) spoken in statement and question form were presented to 40 listeners for evaluation using a two-interval-alternative-forced-choice procedure. Intonational contrasts were achieved in a highly effective manner by the normal, esophageal, and tracheoesophageal speakers. In contrast, users of electronic artificial larynges were generally unable to achieve these intonational distinctions except for one user of the Western Electric #5 electrolarynx.

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