Voice Onset Time in Young and 70-Year-Old Women This study was conducted to determine the effect of aging on voice onset time (VOT). Ten women between 20 and 30 years old and 10 women between 70 and 80 years old read CVC syllables embedded in a carrier phrase. Spectrograms were used to measure VOT for voiced and voiceless ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1983
Voice Onset Time in Young and 70-Year-Old Women
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gary S. Neiman
    Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
  • Richard J. Klich
    Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
  • Elaine M. Shuey
    Children's Rehabilitation Center, Warren, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1983
Voice Onset Time in Young and 70-Year-Old Women
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 118-123. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.118
History: Received June 8, 1981 , Accepted February 12, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 118-123. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.118
History: Received June 8, 1981; Accepted February 12, 1982

This study was conducted to determine the effect of aging on voice onset time (VOT). Ten women between 20 and 30 years old and 10 women between 70 and 80 years old read CVC syllables embedded in a carrier phrase. Spectrograms were used to measure VOT for voiced and voiceless bilabial and velar stops in the context of high and low vowels. Findings revealed that VOT was generally the same in older and younger subjects, and both age groups maintained similar voiced/voiceless and bilabial/velar distinctions. Older subjects demonstrated significantly shorter VOTs only in certain contexts involving place of consonant production and vowel context. The effects of aging on VOT, therefore, seem to appear only in selected phonetic contexts.

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