Phonatory and Manual Reaction Times of Women with Idiopathic Spasmodic Dysphonia This investigation compared the simple reaction times of 10 idiopathic spasmodic dysphonic women and 10 normal-speaking women matched individually for age and handedness. The reaction time stimulus in all response conditions was the offset of a 1000-Hz pure tone. Two of the experimental conditions required right and left forefinger button ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1983
Phonatory and Manual Reaction Times of Women with Idiopathic Spasmodic Dysphonia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan Reich
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • James Till
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • 1 Present affiliation is the VA Medical Center, Long Beaeh, CA.
    Present affiliation is the VA Medical Center, Long Beaeh, CA.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1983
Phonatory and Manual Reaction Times of Women with Idiopathic Spasmodic Dysphonia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 10-18. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.10
History: Received June 15, 1981 , Accepted February 12, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1983, Vol. 26, 10-18. doi:10.1044/jshr.2601.10
History: Received June 15, 1981; Accepted February 12, 1982

This investigation compared the simple reaction times of 10 idiopathic spasmodic dysphonic women and 10 normal-speaking women matched individually for age and handedness. The reaction time stimulus in all response conditions was the offset of a 1000-Hz pure tone. Two of the experimental conditions required right and left forefinger button pressing. The remaining four experimental conditions required phonatory responses. The nonspeech phonatory responses consisted of inspiratory phonation and expiratory throat clearing: the speech-like phonatory responses required abrupt initiation of the isolated vowel // and the word /p/. The spasmodic dysphonic patients differed (p ⩽ .05) from their matched controls only during production of /p/. The results are compared to previous reaction time investigations and are related to factors which potentially can influence sensory-motor pathways prior to and during speech.

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