Incudo-Stapedial Joint Pathology A Tympanometric Approach A Tympanometric Approach Two-component tympanometry with a high probe-tone frequency enables a better distinction to be made between mobile but normal middle-ear systems and middle-ear systems suffering from necrosis, luxation, or disruption. Susceptance and conductance tympanograms obtained from 14 patients with confirmed pathological middle-ear lesions and 8 postmortem temporal bones, experimentally manipulated either ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1982
Incudo-Stapedial Joint Pathology A Tympanometric Approach A Tympanometric Approach
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • P. H. Van de Heyning
    Rijksuniversitair Centrum Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium
  • K. J. Van Camp
    Rijksuniversitair Centrum Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium
  • W. L. Creten
    Rijksuniversitair Centrum Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium
  • P. M. Vanpeperstraete
    Rijksuniversitair Centrum Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 1982
Incudo-Stapedial Joint Pathology A Tympanometric Approach A Tympanometric Approach
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1982, Vol. 25, 611-618. doi:10.1044/jshr.2504.611
History: Received April 27, 1981 , Accepted July 30, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1982, Vol. 25, 611-618. doi:10.1044/jshr.2504.611
History: Received April 27, 1981; Accepted July 30, 1981

Two-component tympanometry with a high probe-tone frequency enables a better distinction to be made between mobile but normal middle-ear systems and middle-ear systems suffering from necrosis, luxation, or disruption. Susceptance and conductance tympanograms obtained from 14 patients with confirmed pathological middle-ear lesions and 8 postmortem temporal bones, experimentally manipulated either surgically or with a 1 N HC1 solution, were compared to tympanograms obtained from 80 normal subjects of an earlier study. With a 660-Hz probe tone, normal middle ears generate bell-shaped or normal sharp W-shaped patterns, whereas the pathologies of the middle ear give rise to irregular multi-extrema tympanograms. The differences between the two types of multi-extrema curves are discussed in detail. The use of phase-angle tympanometry is recommended to enable a quick and accurate distinction between normal and abnormal types of multi-extrema tympanograms. This study also points out clearly that 220-Hz tympanograms do not allow clear differentiation between pathological and normal middle ears.

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