Acoustical Characteristics of Intended Syllabic Stress in Excellent Esophageal Speakers The ability of excellent esophageal speakers to manipulate acoustical characteristics associated with intended syllabic stress was studied. Five excellent esophageal speakers and five sex- and age-matched normals produced 10 sentence pairs, each containing a bisyllabic stimulus item differing only in primary stress placement. The mean fundamental frequency, sound pressure level, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1982
Acoustical Characteristics of Intended Syllabic Stress in Excellent Esophageal Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Monica McHenry
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Alan Reich
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Fred Minifie
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1982
Acoustical Characteristics of Intended Syllabic Stress in Excellent Esophageal Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1982, Vol. 25, 564-573. doi:10.1044/jshr.2504.564
History: Received June 15, 1981 , Accepted October 15, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1982, Vol. 25, 564-573. doi:10.1044/jshr.2504.564
History: Received June 15, 1981; Accepted October 15, 1981

The ability of excellent esophageal speakers to manipulate acoustical characteristics associated with intended syllabic stress was studied. Five excellent esophageal speakers and five sex- and age-matched normals produced 10 sentence pairs, each containing a bisyllabic stimulus item differing only in primary stress placement. The mean fundamental frequency, sound pressure level, and duration of the stressed and unstressed vowel nuclei were analyzed. Although some differences in absolute levels were apparent, only sound pressure level differences reached statistical significance. For both groups, intended primary stress was associated with a comparable pattern of increased fundamental frequency, sound pressure level, and duration. The present findings suggest that excellent esophageal speakers are capable of producing some correlates of primary syllabic stress in a fashion remarkably similar to but somewhat less consistent than normals. The implications of these data for long-range clinical planning are discussed.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access