Early Lexical Acquisition in Children with Specific Language Impairment This study examined the characteristics of early lexical acquisition in children with specific language impairment. Sixteen unfamiliar words and referents were exposed across 10 sessions to language-impaired and normal children matched for level of linguistic development. Posttesting revealed similar comprehension-production gaps in the two groups of children. In addition, both ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1982
Early Lexical Acquisition in Children with Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Richard G. Schwartz
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Kathy Chapman
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Lynne E. Rowan
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Patricia A. Prelock
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Brenda Terrell
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Amy L. Weiss
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Cheryl Messick
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1982
Early Lexical Acquisition in Children with Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1982, Vol. 25, 554-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.2504.554
History: Received May 11, 1981 , Accepted August 13, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1982, Vol. 25, 554-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.2504.554
History: Received May 11, 1981; Accepted August 13, 1981

This study examined the characteristics of early lexical acquisition in children with specific language impairment. Sixteen unfamiliar words and referents were exposed across 10 sessions to language-impaired and normal children matched for level of linguistic development. Posttesting revealed similar comprehension-production gaps in the two groups of children. In addition, both groups showed greater comprehension and production of words referring to objects than words referring to actions. However, the language-impaired children's object word bias was not as marked as that of the normal children. For both groups, words containing initial consonants within the children's production repertoires were more likely to be acquired in production than words containing consonants absent from the children's phonologies. A similar tendency was not seen for comprehension.

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