Use of Contralateral Masking in the Measurement of the Auditory Brainstem Response In the first portion this study, the effects of two levels of contralateral masking on the auditory brainstem response (ABR) were investigated in 10 normal-hearing subjects. No significant changes were observed in the mean latency-intensity functions or the mean amplitude-intensity functions of this group of subjects when noise of various ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1982
Use of Contralateral Masking in the Measurement of the Auditory Brainstem Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larry E. Humes
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Nashville, Tennessee
  • Marleen G. Ochs
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1982
Use of Contralateral Masking in the Measurement of the Auditory Brainstem Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1982, Vol. 25, 528-535. doi:10.1044/jshr.2504.528
History: Received November 10, 1980 , Accepted April 5, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1982, Vol. 25, 528-535. doi:10.1044/jshr.2504.528
History: Received November 10, 1980; Accepted April 5, 1982

In the first portion this study, the effects of two levels of contralateral masking on the auditory brainstem response (ABR) were investigated in 10 normal-hearing subjects. No significant changes were observed in the mean latency-intensity functions or the mean amplitude-intensity functions of this group of subjects when noise of various levels was added to the nontest ear. In the second portion of this study, ABRs were also recorded from the poorer ear of four subjects with a profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Results from the latter group revealed a crossed-over wave V in all cases when the stimulus was delivered to the poorer ear and the nontest (better) ear was not masked. Contralateral masking obliterated this "crossed ABB" in all four unilaterally impaired subjects. These results provide support for the use of contralateral masking when recording from the poorer ear of subjects having asymmetrical hearing loss.

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