The Role of New and Old Information in the Verbal Expression of Language-Disordered Children The present study used an experimental method to investigate the marking of new mad old information in the verbal expression of language-disordered children beyond the one-word stage. The results showed that language-disordered children selectively mark new information in verbal communication, just as normal children do. Language-disordered and normal children, furthermore, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1982
The Role of New and Old Information in the Verbal Expression of Language-Disordered Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Skarakis
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Patricia M. Greenfield
    University of California, Los Angeles
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1982
The Role of New and Old Information in the Verbal Expression of Language-Disordered Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 462-467. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.462
History: Received January 24, 1981 , Accepted August 11, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 462-467. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.462
History: Received January 24, 1981; Accepted August 11, 1981

The present study used an experimental method to investigate the marking of new mad old information in the verbal expression of language-disordered children beyond the one-word stage. The results showed that language-disordered children selectively mark new information in verbal communication, just as normal children do. Language-disordered and normal children, furthermore, manifest the same developmental sequence of strategies for deemphasizing old information—children at an MLU level of 3 tend to omit it, whereas children at an MLU level of 5 tend to pronominalize it. Although both normal and language-disordered children demonstrated the same verbal strategies, a subgroup of language-disordered subjects (over halt) pro-nominalized old information more frequently than norlnal subjects. These language-disordered subjects demonstrated a proportionately different combination of language features than would be expected at their MLU level.

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