Towards an Understanding of Retarded Children's Linguistic Deficiencies The purpose of this study was to provide a more accurate description of the language pertbrmance of retarded children and, by doing so, to understand better how the general mental handicap affects language learning. Subjects were a group of 10 retarded children matched for MA to a group of 10 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1982
Towards an Understanding of Retarded Children's Linguistic Deficiencies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
  • Judith R. Johnston
    Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1982
Towards an Understanding of Retarded Children's Linguistic Deficiencies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 435-445. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.435
History: Received February 26, 1981 , Accepted August 7, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 435-445. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.435
History: Received February 26, 1981; Accepted August 7, 1981

The purpose of this study was to provide a more accurate description of the language pertbrmance of retarded children and, by doing so, to understand better how the general mental handicap affects language learning. Subjects were a group of 10 retarded children matched for MA to a group of 10 normal children and 10 language-impaired children. Various syntactic and semantic analyses were performed. The results indicated that the retarded group's language abilities were essentially comparable to those of the normal group, though differences between these groups were found. Notably, the retarded children did not demonstrate the same linguistic deficiencies as the language-impaired children. It was suggested that the MA-inconsistent language behaviors exhibited by the retarded children were quantitative in nature rather than qualitative and as such seemed to reflect deficits in adaptive (i.e., social) and motivational behaviors rather than deficits in linguistic or cognitive abilities.

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