Supervisor-Supervisee Role Differences and Consistency of Behavior in Supervisory Conferences This study investigated (a) differences in verbal interaction between supervisors and supervisees during the supervisory conference, (b) differences in verbal interaction between early and later conferences, and (c) patterns of verbal interaction displayed by supervisors and snpervisees during the supervisory conference. Subjects were 15 supervisor-supervisee pairs who represented a range ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1982
Supervisor-Supervisee Role Differences and Consistency of Behavior in Supervisory Conferences
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Erwick Roberts
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Kathryn J. Smith
    Indiana University, Bloomington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1982
Supervisor-Supervisee Role Differences and Consistency of Behavior in Supervisory Conferences
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 428-434. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.428
History: Received August 26, 1980 , Accepted July 14, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 428-434. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.428
History: Received August 26, 1980; Accepted July 14, 1981

This study investigated (a) differences in verbal interaction between supervisors and supervisees during the supervisory conference, (b) differences in verbal interaction between early and later conferences, and (c) patterns of verbal interaction displayed by supervisors and snpervisees during the supervisory conference. Subjects were 15 supervisor-supervisee pairs who represented a range of supervisory experience and clinical experience. Three consecutive supervisory conferences were coded using critical ratios derived from a multidimensional interaction analysis system. Results indicated that supervisors' verbal behavior during conferences significantly differs from that of supervisees, with the largest contribution to this difference being the proportion of dialogue coded as initiation, participation, and diagnosis. Over time the group of supervisors and the group of supervisees remained consistent in their behavior. Conference interactions were more analytic than evaluative, more diagnostic than prescriptive, and more simple than complex. The data suggest that supervisors set the content and the interaction pattern of the dialogue, whereas supervisees follow their lead.

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