Auditory Processing of Vowels by Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners "Masking" patterns were obtained in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners using the pulsation-threshold procedure. Synthesized vowel maskers/a/and/æ/were presented at various sound pressure levels and alternated with a sinusoidal probe of a given frequency at a repetition rate of 4 Hz, T = 250 msec. Simultaneous-masking patterns also were obtained in one ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1982
Auditory Processing of Vowels by Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sid P. Bacon
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • John F. Brandt
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1982
Auditory Processing of Vowels by Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 339-347. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.339
History: Received August 7, 1980 , Accepted May 11, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 339-347. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.339
History: Received August 7, 1980; Accepted May 11, 1981

"Masking" patterns were obtained in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners using the pulsation-threshold procedure. Synthesized vowel maskers/a/and/æ/were presented at various sound pressure levels and alternated with a sinusoidal probe of a given frequency at a repetition rate of 4 Hz, T = 250 msec. Simultaneous-masking patterns also were obtained in one normal-hearing listener. The vowel pulsation patterns (VPPs) for the normal-hearing listeners closely resembled the acoustic spectra of the vowel maskers. Neither the pulsation patterns for the hearing-impaired listeners nor the simultaneous-masking patterns for the normal-hearing listener preserved the contour of the vowel spectra. These results are interpreted in terms of suppression effects, which have been observed only with nonsimultaneous-masking paradigms in normal-hearing listeners and have not been observed in listeners with a cochlear hearing loss. The effects of increased masker level were the same for both groups of listeners and are discussed in terms of upward spread of masking and a masking function with a slope less than 1.0.

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