Assessment of Three Modes of Alaryngeal Speech with a Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI) Task in Varying Message-to-Competition Ratios The intelligibility measures and listener preference rankings of pulmonary esophageal speech following tracheo-esophageal puneture (TEP) surgery were assessed relative to traditional esophageal speech, artificial laryngeal speech, and normal laryngeal speech. Intelligibility rankings were obtained with sentence length stimuli in the presence of a background competing message at varying message-to-competition ratios. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1982
Assessment of Three Modes of Alaryngeal Speech with a Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI) Task in Varying Message-to-Competition Ratios
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John Greer Clark
    Cincinnati Center for Improved Communication, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Joseph C. Stemple
    St. Elizabeth Medical Center, Dayton, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1982
Assessment of Three Modes of Alaryngeal Speech with a Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI) Task in Varying Message-to-Competition Ratios
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 333-338. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.333
History: Received December 24, 1980 , Accepted May 11, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1982, Vol. 25, 333-338. doi:10.1044/jshr.2503.333
History: Received December 24, 1980; Accepted May 11, 1981

The intelligibility measures and listener preference rankings of pulmonary esophageal speech following tracheo-esophageal puneture (TEP) surgery were assessed relative to traditional esophageal speech, artificial laryngeal speech, and normal laryngeal speech. Intelligibility rankings were obtained with sentence length stimuli in the presence of a background competing message at varying message-to-competition ratios. Results for 20 normal-hearing adult subjects showed that although pulmonary esophageal speech was the most preferred of the alaryngeal speech modes, it was the least intelligible in the two most difficult listening conditions (-5-dB and -10-dB message-to-competition ratios).

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access