The Processing of Printed Language by Aphasic Adults Some Phonological and Syntactic Effects Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1982
The Processing of Printed Language by Aphasic Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John L. Locke
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • John W. Deck
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Danrille, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1982
The Processing of Printed Language by Aphasic Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 314-319. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.314
History: Received August 5, 1980 , Accepted May 13, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 314-319. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.314
History: Received August 5, 1980; Accepted May 13, 1981

Eight aphasic and eight brain-damaged nonaphasie patients silently "read" a short passage while performing an internal search for specified consonant letters of varying phonological and syntactic salience. The nonaphasie patients showed the phonological and syntactic effects customarily achieved by normal readers. For example, they were more likely to find a letter if it were pronounced than if it were silent, and they were more likely to find a letter if it were in a content word than in a function word. The aphasics had reliable phonological effects hut no observable syntactic effects. Those aphasics with relatively large phonological effects performed better on a separate task requiring the oral reading of isolated words. For reading theory, the primary message from this study is that phonological recoding may occur between word recognition and the completion of semantic analysis, and that recoding may not by itself be sufficient to reading for meaning. For aphasia theory, the main implication of this study is that aphasics read by applying the appropriate phonological strategies, but that such strategies are limited in the face of ineffective syntactic and semantic processing, as occurs in aphasia.

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