Temporal Characteristics of "Functionally" Misarticulated /S/ in 4- to 6-Years-Old Children This paper reviews instrumental studies of "functional" misarticulations in children and reports an experiment involving acoustic measures of the duration of normally articulated and misarticulated /s/. Three subject groups (n = 7 in each group) included normally articulating adults, normally articulating children, and children who misarticulate the /s/ sound. Multiple ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1982
Temporal Characteristics of "Functionally" Misarticulated /S/ in 4- to 6-Years-Old Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gary Weismer
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Mary Elbert
    Indiana University, Bloomington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1982
Temporal Characteristics of "Functionally" Misarticulated /S/ in 4- to 6-Years-Old Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 275-287. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.275
History: Received December 24, 1980 , Accepted April 5, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 275-287. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.275
History: Received December 24, 1980; Accepted April 5, 1981

This paper reviews instrumental studies of "functional" misarticulations in children and reports an experiment involving acoustic measures of the duration of normally articulated and misarticulated /s/. Three subject groups (n = 7 in each group) included normally articulating adults, normally articulating children, and children who misarticulate the /s/ sound. Multiple repetitions of nonsense sequences containing /s/ were obtained from each subject, and group and individual subject comparisons were based on means, standard deviations, and the derived coefficient of variation associated with /s/ duration. Results indicate that /s/ durations of misarticulating children are significantly more variable than those of normally articulating children, and that this difference is more striking in /s/-stop clusters than in the case of singleton /s/. The possibility is raised that the variability differences between the two child groups may reflect differences in speech motor control capabilities. It is suggested that such control differences should predict temporal variability differences between the two child groups for sounds which are articulated correctly by children in both groups. In addition, these variability differences should be observed for the spectral dimension of speech sound production, since this measure is sensitive to control of articulatory configuration.

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