Relationship of Perceived Effectiveness to Verbal Interaction/Content Variables in Supervisory Conferences in Speech-Language Pathology This study investigated the individual supervisory conference in speech-language pathology. The purpose was to determine the relationship between those factors in conference behavior perceived to be effective and the verbal interaction/content variables of the conference, isolating the variables most important for further conference analysis and research. An Individual Supervisory Conference ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1982
Relationship of Perceived Effectiveness to Verbal Interaction/Content Variables in Supervisory Conferences in Speech-Language Pathology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn J. Smith
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Jean L. Anderson
    Indiana University, Bloomington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1982
Relationship of Perceived Effectiveness to Verbal Interaction/Content Variables in Supervisory Conferences in Speech-Language Pathology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 252-261. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.252
History: Received April 24, 1980 , Accepted March 2, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 252-261. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.252
History: Received April 24, 1980; Accepted March 2, 1981

This study investigated the individual supervisory conference in speech-language pathology. The purpose was to determine the relationship between those factors in conference behavior perceived to be effective and the verbal interaction/content variables of the conference, isolating the variables most important for further conference analysis and research. An Individual Supervisory Conference Rating Scale (ISCRS) and portions of Weller's MOSAICS analysis system were used in conference analysis. Factors in conferences which were consistently perceived to be indicators of effectiveness by supervisor-supervisee pairs and trained raters who had completed the ISCRS were direct and indirect behaviors. These two factors correlated frequently and significantly to 21 of the 42 conference verbal interaction/content variables coded using portions of Weller's MOSAICS. Verbal interaction/content variables of particular importance were the sequence of questions and answers; discussion of ideas expressed in both the cognitive and affective domain; and whether discussion focused on analyzing, evaluating, diagnosing, and prescribing behavior. The use of complex or simple statements and questions also was related to perceived effectiveness. The two perceived effectiveness factors identified, as well as the verbal interaction/content variables isolated,appear to be the most critical variables to investigate or manipulate in future supervisory conference research.

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