Speech Discrimination in Preschool Children A Comparison of Two Tasks Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1982
Speech Discrimination in Preschool Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Menary
    McGill University
  • Sandra E. Trehub
    University of Toronto
  • James McNutt
    McGill University
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1982
Speech Discrimination in Preschool Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 202-207. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.202
History: Received August 5, 1980 , Accepted February 17, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 202-207. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.202
History: Received August 5, 1980; Accepted February 17, 1981

Four-year-old children were tested for their discrimination of the following word pairs: rope/robe, seat/seed, pick/pig, ice/eyes, and mouse/mouth. Two discrimination tasks were used: a picture-pointing task, which typifies discrimination tasks currently in use with young children, and an operant technique which exemplifies procedures used in the used in the testing of infants. Both discrimination tasks yielded roughly comparably levels of performance. All word pairs were found to be discriminable, but performance on seat/seed and mouse/mouth was inferior to that of the other word pairs. In a limited sampling of production data, misarticulations were observed in the final consonants of ice, eyes mouse, and mouth.

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