The Effect of Self-Initiated and Other-Initiated Actions on Linguistic Performance Two studies were conducted to determine the effect locus of action had on children's conjunction use and clause ordering. Subjects in the first study were 45 normal children between the ages 3:0 and 5:2. The results of the first study showed that the two contexts in which children performed actions ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1982
The Effect of Self-Initiated and Other-Initiated Actions on Linguistic Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland. Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1982
The Effect of Self-Initiated and Other-Initiated Actions on Linguistic Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 177-183. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.177
History: Received August 5, 1980 , Accepted March 2, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1982, Vol. 25, 177-183. doi:10.1044/jshr.2502.177
History: Received August 5, 1980; Accepted March 2, 1981

Two studies were conducted to determine the effect locus of action had on children's conjunction use and clause ordering. Subjects in the first study were 45 normal children between the ages 3:0 and 5:2. The results of the first study showed that the two contexts in which children performed actions were more facilitating to language performance than the context in which children observed the experimenter perform actions. However, the verbal model which accompanied the two child-initiated action contexts might have contributed to these differences. A second experiment was therefore conducted in which the verbal model was eliminated. No differences in conjunction use or clause ordering were founnd among contexts in the second study. Thus, by itself, locus of action had little influenee on language performance. However, when coupled with the verbal model, which seemed to function as a focusing device, performance was enhanced. It was concluded that child-initiated action contexts which include a verbal instruction are preferred over other-initiated action contexts in which a verbal model is not presented.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access