Language Processing and Forms of Immediate Echolalia in Autistic Children Several aspects of echolalic speech produced by five autistic children were investigated. We found that the incidence of echolalia was influenced by the type of question addressed to the child and, to a lesser extent, by the child's comprehension of the specific relationships expressed in the question. Additionally, acoustic analysis ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1982
Language Processing and Forms of Immediate Echolalia in Autistic Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeanne M, Paccia
    Boston University, Massachusetts
  • Frank Curcio
    Boston University, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1982
Language Processing and Forms of Immediate Echolalia in Autistic Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 42-47. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.42
History: Received July 15, 1980 , Accepted October 27, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 42-47. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.42
History: Received July 15, 1980; Accepted October 27, 1980

Several aspects of echolalic speech produced by five autistic children were investigated. We found that the incidence of echolalia was influenced by the type of question addressed to the child and, to a lesser extent, by the child's comprehension of the specific relationships expressed in the question. Additionally, acoustic analysis showed that a substantial proportion of echoes involved a prosodic modification of the examiner's question. Further analyses indicated that some of these modified echoes represent more than just a primitive conversational strategy. Specifically, they seem to reflect a higher level of processing and serve a semantic function, that of affirming the examiner's question.

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