Frequency Discrimination in Regions of Normal and Impaired Sensitivity Psychometric functions for frequency discrimination were obtained from both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners at 300, 1200, and 3000 Hz. Difference limens for frequency (DLFs) were derived from those psychometric functions after repeated practice sessions, ensuring that all listeners' results represented levels of optimum performance. Practice effects were found to be ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1982
Frequency Discrimination in Regions of Normal and Impaired Sensitivity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher W. Turner
    Hearing Research Laboratory, Minneapolis University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • David A. Nelson
    Hearing Research Laboratory, Minneapolis University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1982
Frequency Discrimination in Regions of Normal and Impaired Sensitivity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 34-41. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.34
History: Received March 10, 1980 , Accepted November 10, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 34-41. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.34
History: Received March 10, 1980; Accepted November 10, 1980

Psychometric functions for frequency discrimination were obtained from both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners at 300, 1200, and 3000 Hz. Difference limens for frequency (DLFs) were derived from those psychometric functions after repeated practice sessions, ensuring that all listeners' results represented levels of optimum performance. Practice effects were found to be considerable in many listeners. The psychometric functions for all listeners, both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired, were well described by linear functions of performance level (d') and frequency difference (Hz), which passed through the zero origin. Those listeners with normal sensitivity thresholds at all frequencies exhibited the most acute frequency discriminations. Listeners with sensitivity losses at high frequencies exhibited larger DLFs, even at lower test frequencies where sensitivity thresholds were normal.

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